Steel, much like stainless steel, is focused on a grade that has a defined objective. Steel is easy to weld than other common materials, generally used in industrial applications, auto-manufacturing, and the oil and gas industry.

Fremont, CA: Precision machining is a method used to make the exact necessary parts as stand-alone parts or components of the machine. These parts need to be machined to a high level of accuracy to fit their particular function and match the machine or system they are to be mounted. Various raw materials can be used for precision machining to make the final parts needed. Here are four common raw materials used in precision machining processes:

COPPER

Copper is another metal that is highly valued for precision machining. Copper offers the benefits of flexibility, reliability, electrical conductivity, and natural resistance to corrosion. Copper does not hold tolerances as well as aluminum, but it is a much better electrical conductor, particularly when plated.

STEEL

Steel is one of the most common metals for all types of manufacturers worth for its strength and durability. Steel, much like stainless steel, is focused on a grade that has a defined objective. Steel is easy to weld than other common materials, generally used in industrial applications, auto-manufacturing, and the oil and gas industry. Steel may be vulnerable to rust without heat treatment by plating.

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ENGINEERED PLASTICS

Engineered plastic has changed dramatically over the last ten years. In semiconductor applications, quartz and aluminum have been replaced by steel due to the enhanced properties that can be produced. It is also more prevalent in medical devices owing to its capacity to be cleaned or self-lubricated. Engineered plastics have been designed to work with many of the strengths of their metal counterparts.

TITANIUM

Titanium is a highly valued and useful metal for machining. Titanium is very heat and corrosion resistant and has the highest strength to weight ratio of any metal. It is also lighter in weight, stable and biocompatible, making it ideal for a broad range of applications from aviation to medical devices. However, one of the disadvantages of titanium is that it can be quite difficult to machine and the price of the material.