Different coating materials can protect parts from heat, heavy wear, and physical impact damage. They also provide non-slip or non-stick surface friction on floors, handles, and machining surfaces.

Fremont, CA: Contrary to popular belief, an industrial coating is not just an aesthetic finish on industrial equipment or base materials. It acts as an engineered barrier that protects parts from a wide variety of damages and extreme environments. Concrete, plastics, and metal materials are often strong on their own in many ways. Still, each of these base materials needs a layer of the protective coating that adheres to its surface and protects it from corrosion. Industrial coatings protect materials and components, ranging from piping to machinery to floors and other surfaces. These coatings can be applied using sprays, brushes, or even dipped in, with each application type requiring carefully crafted formulating. A company's choice of application method should complement its production capabilities and create efficiencies rather than bottlenecks.

Top 10 Manufacturing Coating Solution Companies - 2020Also, industrial coatings can do much more than safeguard materials from corrosion. Different coating materials can protect parts from heat, heavy wear, and physical impact damage. They also provide non-slip or non-stick surface friction on floors, handles, and machining surfaces. Industrial coatings can also repel dirt, grease, and contaminants with a nonporous topcoat. The use of industrial coatings is widespread across industrial and commercial settings. Food-safe containers need coatings that prevent corrosion and comply with food safety standards, whereas steel beams may need corrosion-preventing coatings that also withstand particular fire and temperature conditions. Manufacturers who select their layers and application methods carefully will produce safer products with longer service lives.

Some of the famous industrial coatings' popular applications include building materials, construction, consumer packaged goods, and manufacturing. Architectural products, engineered roofing, decking systems, tools, heavy equipment, infrastructure parts, canning, commercial plastics, containers, industrial machinery, and walking surfaces are all examples of use cases for industrial coating. Selecting the right application method is just the first step of a multi-step process. As manufacturers finalize their industrial coating preferences for each of their products, it's essential to understand how surrounding procedures like proper surface preparation, selection of application method and equipment contribute to a successful paint line. For an industrial coating to take hold, the substrate, or the base material receiving the protective layer, must be completely clean. Many industrial coatings rely on a mechanical or physical bond to adhere tightly to the substrate surface. Some coatings even chemically bond with the substrate surface to create a nearly impenetrable layer of protection.

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