Traditional electronic manufacturing methods have become increasingly inadequate over time, particularly in high-density interconnection (HDI) architectures. Low yields, high production costs, and restricted flexibility are all disadvantages of traditional electronic manufacturing systems.

Fremont, CA: Some firms still regard laser processing as a relatively new technology, which has fueled the growth and demand for laser processing technologies to deliver high-quality products over the decades. In the printed circuit board (PCB) business, the usage of laser technology is viewed as important for technical advancement and cutting-edge innovation that provides functional and stylish electronic gadgets. The PCB sector is gradually taking charge and rising above traditional processing technologies used in the electrical industry by combining laser processing technologies.

The Case for CO2 Lasers

PCBs are made by drilling microvias (tiny holes) that allow electrical connections to be made between the layers of the circuit boards. Carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers have been used by industry for years to reach this precision (see Fig. 1). Unfortunately, CO2 utilization in the PCB industry has declined in recent years, with only around 20 percent currently using it. Over the course of two decades of operation, CO2 laser technology has proven to be effective at eliminating dielectric, even nonuniform glass dielectric. CO2 lasers, on the other hand, cannot remove copper or drill holes smaller than 75 m in diameter. UV lasers, on the other hand, can drill microscopic holes and even remove electro copper foil. CO2 laser technology is slowly becoming more popular as the demand for more sophisticated and high-quality electronic equipment grows. CO2 laser technologies must improve and work to provide revolutionary laser technology to keep up with the rapid pace of electronic innovation.

This isn't to say that CO2 lasers aren't useful. On the contrary, CO2 laser technology is advancing, giving it a foothold in the PCB industry—but the UV laser is more successful in ensuring that producers obtain the best. While useful in the PCB business, the UV laser has a few drawbacks. Although UV laser technology may remove dielectric materials, it is slow and inconsistent on glass-reinforced materials. The greatest results are obtained by using a hybrid laser drill system that includes both UV and CO2 lasers, with the CO2 laser providing quick drilling and the UV laser drilling small holes and copper foil.

Mainstreaming HDI Laser Processing Techniques

Traditional electronic manufacturing methods have become increasingly inadequate over time, particularly in high-density interconnection (HDI) architectures. Low yields, high production costs, and restricted flexibility are all disadvantages of traditional electronic manufacturing systems. Manufacturing businesses must embrace the usage of laser processing technologies to ensure that the HDI structure and PCBs are useful and in line with rapid technological improvements. PCB multilayer businesses, on the other hand, are producing better resolution devices and providing variety in manufacturing processing as well as fast processing speeds as a result of technology companies adopting HDI processing.